Issues

Summer 2017 Issue

Editor’s letter

Dear Reader, through our tight network of coaches and their players we have access to behind the scenes stories that other journalists and tennis aficionados cannot get. There is so much valuable information and inspiring stories being discussed in the locker room, or in the gym, at the player’s lounge restaurant, or over a beer at the hotel. For those coaches, players and parents out there who have questions but cannot seem to find the right answers – ELITE is for you.


IN THIS ISSUE:

1

Doug MacCurdy: Pioneer

”Extraordinary opportunities combined with natural abilities and access to master teachers are considered the main ingredients in the formation of a prodigy. Think Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, Mozart and Tiger Woods.”

by Robert Davis

2

The Result Must Count for Something

”The reason why I decided to focus on tennis was partly that I liked losing more in an individual sport. Yes that’s right, because you had no one else to blame than yourself. I hated losing, don’t get me wrong, my closest friends know how difficult I was to be around after defeat.”

by Magnus Norman

3

Ask Questions to Succeed

“I watch too many players who jump on the tour but don’t bring the tour with them. Generally, they don’t have the strength of mind yet to survive. Where do you see yourself in the game? Do you think you belong on the Futures circuit or do you see yourself on the ATP Tour?”

by Roger Rasheed

4

The Building of a Competitor

”There are moments in tennis when opportunities present themselves that a player must learn to seize in order to win. These moments are seen and seized by those players who have the experience of winning regularly. They are usually seized by doing simple acts of discipline during point that seem slight and non-important at the time.”

by Chuck Kriese

5

What Gives Novak and Bryan Brothers an Edge

”Yes, natural ability helps a tennis player, but I have observed firsthand how professionalism and detailed preparation can take a player to the highest levels of our sport.”

by Dusan Vemic

6

No Shortcuts, Work for It

”Sometimes players will only want to play with the best players all the time, but then, when they go to a tournament and face a very tough player, they get disappointed.”

by Hugo Ekker

7

Developing a Player for the Pro Game

”It’s no surprise that the best players in the world are either very good or great servers or very good or great returners. I should mention that Stan Wawrinka and Marin Cilic have both improved their serving and returning in recent years.”

by Scott McCain

8

On Jordan Thompson's Rise from Futures to World’s Top 100

”The biggest thing that Jordan had to do was reign in his temper. Working on getting to the point where his temper is not costing him matches.”

by Des Tyson

9

What Happened to the Volley?

”Tennis had become a bit one dimensional where players hit the hell out of the ball and hope it does not come back.”

by Pat Cash

10

Portrait of a Tennis Father and Loyal Son

”The beauty of Nikolay’s dream in the beginning was not tennis stardom, but rather, just an incredible urge to spend every waking hour of the day with his son. As tennis success began to pile up, the dream was transferred to the tennis courts.”

by Robert Davis

11

Player’s Perspective: Dmitry Tursunov

”The losses and drops in ranking seems to linger more in your heart and mind than the feel good moments of winning. Funny, but it feels like the rise in rankings never lasts as long as the drops.”

by Dmitry Tursunov

12

Player’s Perspective: Alisa Kleybanova

”I would suggest to my fourteen year-old self and to other young players and their parents that, no matter what the results are, always remember that the recovery is as important as the training process.”

by Alisa Kleybanova

Summer 2017 Issue

Spring 2017 Issue